Visual Studio Team Services and FAKE


What is VSTS?

Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) is Microsoft’s cloud-based source control / CI build / work item tracking system (with a nice visual task board). It’s a platform that is evolving relatively quickly, with lots of new features being added all the time. It also comes with a number of plans including a free plan which entitles you to an unlimited number of private repositories with up to 5 users (and MSDN users do not count), plus a fixed number of hours for centralized builds.

The catch is that there is (at least, I couldn’t find!) any way to host a completely public repository with unlimited users – obviously a big problem if you want to have an open source project with lots of contributors. But for a private team, it might be a good model for you. You can also use the CI build facilities of VSTS with GitHub repositories – so in this sense you can treat it as a competitor to something like AppVeyor perhaps.

Contrary to common opinion, VSTS is completely compatible with Git as a source control repository. Yes, you can opt to use TFS as a source control model, but (in my opinion) you’d have to be crazy to do this or have a team that are really used to the TFS way of working – I find Git to be a much, much more effective source control system.

Why FAKE?

I wanted to try and see whether it was possible to get VSTS working with FAKE.

One of the best things about FAKE is, in addition to the ease of use, flexibility and power that you get by creating build tasks directly within F# (and therefore with the full .NET behind it), is that because you are not dependent on hosting a bespoke build server with custom tasks etc., such as Team City, it’s extremely rare (hopefully never) that you have a situation where a build runs locally but fails to run on the build server.

Unlike relying on e.g. Team City to orchestrate your build, you delegate the entire CI build steps to FAKE – MSBuild, Unit Tests, configuration file rewriting etc. etc.. So if the build fails, you don’t have to e.g. log into the Team City box, check some log files etc. – your FAKE script does all the heavy lifting so you can run the exact same steps locally.

Putting it all together

So my goal was to write a simple FAKE build script which pulled down any dependencies, performed a build and ran unit tests – all integrated within VSTS. As it turns out, it wasn’t very difficult at all.

Firstly, we hook up the build to source control. In our case, it’s the Git repository of the Team Project, so works straight out of the box, but you can point to another Git repository e.g. GitHub as well. You can also select multiple branches. We then set a trigger to occur on each commit.

1.pngSecondly, we have to set up the actual build steps. As we’re delegating to FAKE to perform the whole build + tests, we want to use as few “custom” VSTS tasks as possible. In fact, we actually only need two steps.

  1. Some way to download Paket or Nuget, and then initiate the FAKE build.
  2. Some way of tieing in the results of XUnit that we’re going to run in FAKE into the VSTS test reports.

Unlike old-school TFS etc., VSTS now has an extensible and rich set of build tasks that you can chain together – no need for Workflow Foundation etc. at all here: –

3.png

Notice the “Batch Script” task above – perfect for our needs, as we can use it to perform our first build task to download Paket and then start FAKE.

We can now see what the FAKE script does – this is probably nothing more than what you would do normally with FAKE anyway to clean the file system, perform a build and then run unit tests: –

Notice that when we run unit tests, we also emit the results as an XML file. This is where the second build task comes into VSTS (Publish Test Results), which is used to parse the XML results and tie into VSTS’ build report.

2.png

So when we next perform a commit, we’ll see a build report that looks something like this: –

4.png

Notice that the chart on the right shows that I’ve run 2 unit tests that were successful – this is the second build task parsing the XUnit output. Of course we can also drill into the different stages if needed to see the output: –

5.png

Conclusion

This post isn’t as much about either VSTS or FAKE features per se, as it is about illustrating how both VSTS and FAKE are flexible enough that we can plug the two together. What’s great about this approach is that we’re not locked in to VSTS as a build system – we’re just using FAKE and running it centrally – but if we’re using VSTS we also can benefit from the integration that VSTS offers with e.g. Visual Studio and the build system e.g. creating work items, associating commits to work items and viewing from VS etc. etc. – whilst still using FAKE for our build.

Advertisements

One thought on “Visual Studio Team Services and FAKE

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s