F# Azure Storage Type Provider v1.0 released!


So, last week I finally released the F# Azure Storage Type Provider as v1! I learned a hell of a lot about writing Type Providers in F# as a result over the last few months… Anyway – v1.0 deals with Blobs and Tables; I’m hoping to integrate Queues and possibly Files in the future (the former is particularly powerful for a scripting point of view). You can get it on NuGet or download the source (and add issues etc.) through GitHub.

Working with Blobs

Here’s a sample set of containers and blobs in my local development storage account displayed through Visual Studio’s Server Explorer and some files in the “tp-test” container: –

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You can get to a particular blob in two lines of code: –

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The first line connects to the storage account – in this example I’m connecting to the local storage emulator, but to connect to a live account, just provide the account name and storage key. Once you navigate to a blob, you can download the file to the local file system, read it as a string, or stream it line-by-line (useful for dealing with large files). Of course you get full intellisense for the containers and folders automatically – this makes navigating through a storage account extremely easy to do: –

4 5

Working with Azure Tables

The Table section of the type provider gives you quick access to tables, does a lot of the heavy lifting for doing bulk inserts (automatically batching up based on partition and maximum batch size), and gives you a schema for free. This last part means that you can literally go to any pre-existing Azure Table that you might have and start working with it for CRUD purposes without any predefined data model.

Tables are automatically represent themselves with intellisense, and give you a simple API to work with: –

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Results are essentially DTOs that represent the table schema. Whilst Tables have no enforced schema, individual rows themselves do have one, and we can interrogate Azure to understand that schema and build a strongly-typed data model over the top of it. So the following schema in an Azure table:

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becomes this in the type provider: –

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All the properties are strongly typed based on their EDM type e.g. string, float etc. etc.. We can also execute arbitrary plain-text queries or use a strongly-typed query builder to chain clauses and ultimately execute a query remotely: –

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Whilst this is not quite LINQ over Azure, there’s a reason for this. Ironically, the Azure SDK supports IQueryable to table storage. But because Table Storage is weak, computationally speaking, there’s severe restrictions on what you can do with LINQ – basically just Where and Take. The benefit of a more restrictive query set that the Type Provider delivers is that it is guaranteed compile time to generate a query that will be accepted by Azure Tables, where IQueryable over Tables does not.

The generated provided types  also expose the raw set of values for the entities as key/values so that you can easily push this data into other formats e.g. Deedle etc. if you want.

Future Plans

I’d like to make some other features for the Storage Type Provider going forward, such as: –

  • Azure Storage Queue Support
  • “Individuals” support (a la the SQL Type Provider) for Tables
  • Support for data binding on generated entities for e.g. WPF integration
  • Potentially removing the dependency on the Azure Storage SDK
  • Option types on Tables (either through schema inference or provided by configuration)
  • Connection string through configuration
  • More Async support

If you are looking to get involved with working on a Type Provider – or have some Azure experience and want to learn more about F# – this would be a good project to cut your teeth on 🙂

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